Sick of GIG Greed #NOonProp22 #SickOfGigGreed
Sick of GIG Greed #NOonProp22 #SickofGigGreed

UBER AND LYFT MAKE US SICK

Worker Stories

Because Prop 22 isn’t just about wages and benefits. It’s about real people.

Mike Robinson, Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

Mike Robinson spent most of his working life as a union sheetmetal worker, but his shop dropped from 100 to 50 to 25 to finally just 8 workers.

When his factory was purchased by an overseas billionaire and after hearing rumors about right to work, Mike quit to drive Lyft full time. Much like his experience in the shop, it was a solid job at first, but over time, the rates went down and he had to drive longer hours to make ends meet.

This time, rather than leave for a new job, he’s dedicated to fighting for a union for gig workers. “With the COVID-19 crisis, drivers are facing severe economic hardship. For far too many of us, a $300 expense could mean having to choose between paying rent and putting food on the table or paying fines to avoid having our accounts deactivated,” said Mike Robinson. “While we’re forced to shoulder this burden, Uber and Lyft are spending tens of millions of dollars on a ballot initiative to exclude themselves from following the law or having to provide us with the workplace protections we are entitled to.” Read more.

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Luz Laguna, Uber and Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

Luz Laguna has driven for Uber and Lyft for over two years, and like so many in the gig economy, has been forced to continue working throughout the pandemic to make ends meet.

As ridership has fallen during the COVID-19 crisis, Luz has transitioned into full-time delivery driving for UberEats. Lower rates for delivery runs mean Luz is now working longer and longer hours just to keep her bills paid and food on the table. As Los Angeles enters its second month under the Mayor’s Safer at Home order, Luz has still not received any personal protective equipment from Uber, despite an order from City Hall requiring employers like Uber to provide essential workers with masks, sanitizer, and other protective equipment while on the job.

Luz has been paying out of pocket for cleaning supplies and face masks to keep herself safe, further driving down the already low wages paid out by her employer. Luz is part of Solidarity Summer with Mobile Workers Alliance, Uber and Lyft drivers coming together to fight the anti-driver ballot measure.

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Jerome Gage, Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

Jerome Gage has been a driver with Lyft for 5 years. His interest in rideshare driving was from the promise of flexible scheduling, Jerome soon found that so-called “flexibility” touted by the companies was nothing more than an empty promise. Repeated rate cuts by Lyft left Jerome working longer and longer hours simply to make ends meet.

Now, in the midst of the most serious public health crisis in more than a century, Jerome has seen demand for rides plummet, leaving him without the income he has come to rely on from Lyft. Even worse, his misclassification as a so-called “independent contractor” has left him unable to access basic safety net programs like Unemployment Insurance. Each day, Jerome is forced to choose between staying safe at home, or working to keep his bills paid and risk infection.

Read Jerome’s response to Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi’s cruel take on the current public health crisis.

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Cherri Murphy, Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

“The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed another disease that’s been running rampant for a long time. It’s called corporate greed. It prefers profits over people. For example, just the other day I worked for approximately 10 hours and made $90. Lyft has refused to waive the rental fee, which means I won’t see any of that money,” says Cherri Murphy, Lyft Driver and Gig Workers Rising member.

“And while I work for Lyft, potentially free, they refuse to provide access to sanitation and protective gear, such as access to hand washings and hand sanitizers and face masks…I want to  protect not only myself both physically and economically, but I also want to provide support and protections to the people that I’m driving to and from.”

Lyft and Uber put profits over people. We need California to enforce AB 5.

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Eden Alva, Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

“Lyft has been putting drivers like me and passengers at risk during the coronavirus era and long before by misclassifying drivers employees as contractors. Lyft is paying me less than minimum wage for my work, exposing me to significantly enhanced risk, and yet not providing me with basic worker protections required by law.” said Eden Alva, Lyft driver for 5 years and Gig Member Rising member 

“In January I became sick with regular flu, when the symptoms started I did not yet earn enough money to cover my upcoming rent payment. I had no choice but to keep working through a couple of days of sickness and pay my rent.”

California should enforce AB 5 and protect “critical workers” in accordance with the law.

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Jessica, Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

“I’ve been working for lyft about a year now. During this crisis, it’s been really a struggle to make ends meet because we have no resources. We don’t have financial resources…I’m tapped out. I don’t have any money.” says Jessica, Lyft driver

“Resources right now are limited because nobody can be outside. I was actually given a doctor order to stay inside because I have a sick child. And so me as an independent contractor, driving for Lyft was my only full time job so I’m just stuck. I wish someone could help us. We shouldn’t have to suffer like this. We work hard.”

Lyft continues to misclassify drivers, denying them employee status & access to paid family sick leave during the pandemic..

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Yash, Uber & Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

“I’ve been hit hard with COVID crisis. in the last couple of weeks I lost my income. It’s been down to nine bucks an hour, after expense its four or five dollars an hour. I’ve been taking people from and to the hospital. Some people have colds, some people were coughing and sneezing in my car. I’m concerned about potential exposure to the coronavirus. Now I’ve stopped working for fear for coronavirus.” said Yash Uber & Lyft driver and a member of Gig Workers Rising.

Since I’ve stopped working I’ve spent more than $2,000 on groceries, car payment, gas, house and utility expenses…My savings are shrinking fast. I applied for unemployment and it’s been a week with no word from the state. We need help as soon as possible. We can’t afford a delay.

“Essential” workers, drivers work without health insurance, protective gear, paid time off or paid family leave.

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Tenia, Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

People are coming here to work and they’re sleeping in their cars, camping out here just to make money and they can’t afford to live….If I’m calculating my hourly or take-home pay at the end of me paying Lyft it’s like $9 an hour…I’m making change, it’s not even minimum wage. I just want to be paid fairly for my timeI just want to paid fairly for my time,” says Tenia, a Lyft driver who has seen how the rental program has made it harder and harder for drivers to make ends meet.

“I’m starting off my week in a $400 hole it seems like, and I have to work 12-hour days in order to get myself out of that hole—and then hopefully I make enough at the end of the week to be able to pay my bills. It’s taken a toll on my sleep. I get maybe three or four hours of sleep and then I’m right back to it.+

Lyft’s rental programs keep drivers in debt.

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Bill, Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

“I’ve been driving since I was 16. 46 years without an accident of any kind until I got rear ended driving for Lyft. It’s been very, very rough getting restarted because of loss of income, I lost my car and had to replace my vehicle, and was two months behind on my rent…[Lyft] did absolutely nothing for me,” says Bill, recalling what it was like after he was rear ended last year.

“I was unable to buy a vehicle. Because I drove for Lyft and my credit was ruined because the banks don’t recognize that as an income. They did absolutely nothing for me, they didn’t give a damn. I was just another casualty.”

Misclassified workers injured on the job don’t qualify for worker’s comp or lost wages.

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José Galindo, Uber and Lyft driver

Posted in: Worker Stories

“I realized that the trips I was getting before, the price was going down little by little…50% was being cut out of what I usually do when I drive on long rides. I started taking more and more notes, now past the second year, I said, ‘Man, what am I going to do?” said José Galindo, an Uber and Lyft driver

I’m stuck…I’m actually in the negative. If I’m working 16 hours and I’m not even making what I was making the first year I started in eight hours, there’s something wrong.” 

Uber and Lyft have slashed pay leaving drivers in debt.

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